Yes, I’m alone but I’m alone and free.

My conclusion after my divorce. Pretty deep for a Disney movie, and also probably why I was hugely jealous of Elsa’s ice castle and identified with her on some level.

(Source: rons-weasley)

thetardisismyhome:

Farscape: The Peacekeeper Wars

Aeryn disarms herself on the Scarran ship.

The radiant Aeryn Sun. Yes child, she can be your role model.

fallontonight:

Our Pal Kevin Bacon will be appearing on the show tonight!

Use of this GIF comes with expectations. Like I want Kevin in this outfit and for there to be glitter and dancing involved. MAKE IT SOOOOOOOO.

fallontonight:

Our Pal Kevin Bacon will be appearing on the show tonight!

Use of this GIF comes with expectations. Like I want Kevin in this outfit and for there to be glitter and dancing involved. MAKE IT SOOOOOOOO.

prognly:

This movie is one of the best disney movies of all time

This movie ranks at the top of my and the kids’ most quoted movies list. Second place would be A Muppet Christmas Carol.

(Source: kinghanalister)

latenightseth:

What should go on Seth’s new desk? Tell us in a photo, GIF, sketch or just a simple text post (tagging it with #SethsDesk) and you could win a trip to NYC to meet Seth at one of our test shows!

Official rules here.

Wedding portrait of him and Stefon - DUH!

latenightseth:

What should go on Seth’s new desk? Tell us in a photo, GIF, sketch or just a simple text post (tagging it with #SethsDesk) and you could win a trip to NYC to meet Seth at one of our test shows!

Official rules here.

Wedding portrait of him and Stefon - DUH!

2,500 likes!

2,500 likes!

(Source: assets)

I finished the book and I am still processing. Despite all the tears shed while I was reading it, the biggest compliment I could give John Green in the wake of finishing The Fault In Our Stars is that at some point while I was reading I managed to not imagine Hazel as my daughter and just saw her as Hazel, the main character in The Fault In Our Stars. The tears eventually represented what was happening in the story and not a result of over identifying with what was happening in the story.

I may have more to say about the book after I’ve finished absorbing it. I would like to comment on how well written the story was - no lags or fluff or pages of nonessential prose. A well-constructed story will always be at the top of my favorites list. But the personal victory I feel I have achieved by finally facing my irrational fear of the book by reading it will be the true reason I will likely never forget this experience.

Thank you, John Green, for crafting such an absorbing and well-written story that many childhood cancer patients and their families and close friends have only wished they could put into words. Hopefully it will take some of the stigma out of talking or *gasp* JOKING about the “C word” around the patients and survivors who mostly just want to be NORMAL and maybe not so special because of this disease.

“'I'm like. Like. I'm like a grenade, Mom. I'm a grenade and at some point I'm going to blow up and I would like to minimize the casualties, okay?'”

Pg. 99, The Fault In Our Stars by John Green

When N started school, she became friends with a girl named Danielle, who was fighting the same rare childhood cancer that N was in remission for, but Danielle’s had been found later and was more invasive. I got a call from Danielle’s mom that Danielle’s cancer was back with a vengeance and that the doctor was giving her three months to live. She wanted to set up some play dates for the girls, but she understood that I may not want N to see Danielle anymore knowing that in the very near future Danielle would die. Both N and Danielle were 7 at the time.

I told her I would think it over and call her back. As the parent of N, my allowing N to continue seeing and playing with Danielle as if nothing was wrong, while knowing that Danielle was dying and that at some egregious point I was going to have to explain death to my 7-year-old, might be considered a no-brainer to some parents. Why allow my daughter to suffer when I knew that suffering is exactly what she would go through if I allowed her to get closer to Danielle when I knew that Danielle was going to die?

But as the mom of a cancer survivor, I could look at the situation from the POV of Danielle’s mom, too. How would I feel if N had been the one given a 3-months-to-live diagnosis and the result was that none of her friends’ parents would let her play with their kids anymore because they wanted to protect THEIR kids and put THEIR kids in a bubble where your 7-year-old friends don’t die? Well that would suck and be all kinds of not right. And it would make the last months of my daughter’s life sadder and lonelier than any person’s life should be - especially a child’s.

So I called Danielle’s mother back and N and Danielle had some fun times together. After a couple of months, Danielle started deteriorating rapidly and then she passed away. N is now 19 and after 12 years, she still remembers Danielle and her death had a true impact on her. She visits her grave on the anniversary of her death and we have a picture of the two of them sitting amongst a collection of family photos in the living room. N has never forgotten Danielle, so even though N’s suffering was “collateral damage” from Danielle’s death - Danielle has lived on all these years in N’s heart and that is why I have never regretted my decision back then.

This quote made me think about that decision I made - mainly because I have wondered whether N agrees that I made the right decision, since essentially it was up to me to make it due to N’s age at the time.

“'Qualities of a Good Nurse…'
‘2. Gets blood on the first try…’”

Pg. 75, The Fault In Our Stars by John Green

Seriously though, the night we checked N into Riley, the first blood draw took two nurses, involved a lot of thrashing and crying, and ended with blood on the floor. Not a pretty sight.